Spiritual Condition and the Analogy of Physical Fitness

In my previous post, “Naming Our Own Spiritual Condition,” I talked about spiritual condition in terms of our ability to help accomplish God’s purposes. In this post, through the use of physical fitness as an analogy, I offer some elements of spiritual condition and contend that one of them affects all the others. Using a physical fitness framework is limiting, but I hope that it might also be helpful.

Art used by Pat Marvenko Smith, copyright 1992. http://www.revelationillustrated.com

Art used by Pat Marvenko Smith, copyright 1992. http://www.revelationillustrated.com

I believe that one’s spiritual condition can be thought of as the fitness of one’s spiritual body and the extent to which it is free to operate in daily life. When we are spiritually fit, we perceive, respond to and accomplish the purpose that God has given us with ease and confidence. When we are less fit, we misperceive what we are called to do, try to speed up or slow down down the process, or approach it using means that will limit or derail the outcome.

Prior to assisting with the redemption of the world, we need to have moved through some preliminary conditions. In particular, we need to have become aware of, open to and able to receive Spirit. Also, we need to have assented to be changed by God. I believe that once a person has become willing to be changed, the quality of one’s spiritual condition influences how the relationship and work will proceed.

How well a person engages in or accomplishes a physical activity is likely influenced by their physical fitness. A personal training website lists eleven components of physical fitness. As you read the list, imagine yourself or another person engaged in a sport (e.g., football, gymnastics) or physical activity (e.g., cooking, repairing a car).

1. Agility – The ability to stop, start, and change directions quickly
2. Balance – Controlling body positions while standing still or moving
3. Body Composition – The ratio of muscle to fat in the body
4. Cardiovascular Endurance – Engaging in physical activity for long periods of time
5. Coordination – Making movements work together smoothly
6. Flexibility – Moving joints through a wide range of motion
7. Muscular Endurance – Using muscles repetitively without fatiguing
8. Muscular Strength – Produces force using muscles
9. Power – The ability to use muscle strength quickly
10. Reaction Time – How quickly an individual responds to a stimulus
11. Speed – Performing a movement of covering a distance in a short period of time

When you are finished, review the list again thinking about how these elements might or have come into play in your response to a call or leading. You might focus on a single incident or a life-long endeavor.

A single incident might be speaking in meeting. Have you spoken in Meeting then later learned that the message was for you or should have been spoken by another? Have you found that you might get more than one message and that one may be for you and the other for the Meeting?

A life-long endeavor might be your following a leading. What have you learned about your ability to carry out the leading? What have you discerned about yourself given your times of obedience and your times of getting off the path?

Whether for single incidents or for life-long endeavors, I believe body composition (#3) affects all of the other elements. When doing a physical activity, if a person carries a lot of fat, they will have difficulty with balancing and coordination and limited speed. If a person has little muscle, they will have little strength, power, or agility.

I believe the same is true in spiritual matters. Spiritual fat might be thought of as deposits in our spiritual body that weigh us down, limiting our ability to connect with or stay with Spirit. Spiritual muscle might be our ability to stay centered, aligning our will with God’s desire for us.

In my next post, I will discuss “naming” and how we can use it to change our “body composition.” Through naming, I believe we can release the weight of the world and come to find rest in God (Matthew 11:28-30).

 

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One thought on “Spiritual Condition and the Analogy of Physical Fitness

  1. Pingback: Naming for Spiritual Freedom and Greater Service | Quaker Mystics

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